AURUM METALLICUM

· 4 min read

In terms of human duality, Aurum matches the extreme contrasts of spirit­uality and materialism, detachment and addiction, reverence and fanaticism, resolve and vulnerability, love and hate, dispassion and envy, altruism and self-absorption, aspiration and desire, integrity and corruption, bliss and despair, transcendence and suicide. It is for the idealist whose fantasies and romantic notions soar beyond the reasonable: it is for the pragmatic ration­alist whose thoughts remain anchored to the physical dimension. Its splendour speaks of the “old soul” who brings the message of wisdom and love to human­ity; its heaviness portrays a solemnity and seriousness of nature, or a tendency to be weighed down by negative emo­tions. While the radiance of gold is apparent, its darkness is hidden; the Aurum being’s inner nature is often con­cealed from others – masked, private and secretive.

“Imagines he cannot succeed in anything, and he does everything wrong; he is in disunion with himself.”

Imagines he sees obstacles in his way everywhere.

He is all the time imaging that he has neglected something, that he has neglected his friends.

He imagines that he deserves reproach in consequence of having neglected duty; he has neglected something, he is wrong, is wholly evil, has sinned away his day of grace, is not worthy of salvation; this is the train of thought that constantly runs through his mind.

The thought really becomes uncontrollable; he is absorbed in himself and sits and broods over it, and by brooding over it he only intensifies his present state and hatches new grievances, continues to worry over himself, thinks he is wholly unfit for this world, and then he longs to die.

He looks on the dark side of everything, constantly expecting bad news, looking for everything to go wrong. The future looks dark to him, and he wants to die; he never will succeed, for everything goes wrong that he turns his hand to.

His business is dark, his family troubles him, his friends annoy him; he becomes extremely irritable, easily angered, is worried over trifles, and easily excited.

Every little thing rouses him into anger and turmoil, he is always in a vexation. The Aurum state of mind is an insanity dreadful to look upon because of its turbulence and melancholy.

It is suitable in the most profound states of melancholy and depression where the patient sits silent and says nothing. When disturbed he is aroused to great vehemence, anger and violence.

“Melancholy, feels hateful and quarrelsome.”

“Terrible melancholy after abuse of Mercury.”

The causes of this state of insanity are prolonged anxiety, unusual responsibility, syphilis and loss of property.

Persons who have been repeatedly drugged with Mercury, have established upon themselves a mercurial disease, with enlargement of the liver, and this is almost always attended more or less by melancholy and sadness and such hopelessness as we find in Aurum.

Aurum produces such affections of the liver as are associated with cardiac affections, endocarditis, dropsy of the heart and rheumatic affections that have gone to the heart.

You will notice that wherever the affections are pre-eminently disturbed in mental, disease that there is either cardiac weakness, endocarditis, enlargement of the heart, or some organic or functional disease of the heart.

You will very often find a history of taking Mercury that has superinduced a rheumatic state that has been rubbed away with liniments until the heart is affected, and with this comes hopelessness, insanity of the will, disturbance of the affections.

Then it appears to spread in this remedy from the will to the understanding, and the intellectual portion of man becomes involved. Think what a state it is for a man who has been in good condition of health, respected in his business circles, to have a desire to commit suicide.

You will see other kinds of insanity and a breaking down or a state of feebleness of the intellect, he cannot think nor reason; his affections are practically intact, but he finally goes into a state of imbecility, or he becomes wild and commits suicide from impulse.

That is an instance where the intellect has been affected first and spread to the will. Sometimes this state comes on, and no disturbance in the man’s intellectual nature has been observed; it is intact, it is sound.

He has been sound in his business affairs, he has been a good father, he has been observed by those around him to be intelligent, but he has silently brooded over his state and his hatred of the world; he has told nobody of it, and then, he has been found hung in his room.

The man’s intellectual nature keeps the man in contact with the world; but his affections are largely kept to himself. A man can have affection for all sorts of things and perversion of the affections, but his intellect will guide him not to show his likes and dislikes to the world.

The affections cannot be seen, but man’s intellect is subject to inspection. He cannot conceal his intellect. We shall see that the affections are interior, they are covered with a cloak, they are his innermost and are hidden from inspection; but the understanding is the outermost garment, it surrounds and hides his affections, just as does the garment he wears over the body hide the body. The affections that Aurum resembles are those like unto the very innermost nature of man.

“Ailments from grief, disappointed love, fright, anger, contradiction, mortification.”

“Pain makes her desperate so that she would like to jump out of the window.”

He meditates upon death, upon suicide; he wants to get out of the world, wants to destroy himself, has no love for his life which he thinks is worthless.

Reference: David Lilley on Aurum
Kent’s Lectures on Aurum

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